Transportable Homes Maintenance [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 19, 2010 under Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

What about Transportable Home Maintenance?

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey discusses the importance of relocatable home maintenance.

 

 

Transportable homes are designed to require the bare minimum of maintenance, leaving you to enjoy your new lifestyle.

The warranty and guarantee of relocatable homes will have conditions which include the completion of maintenance in order to remain covered.

Ask your building contractor –

  • exactly what maintenance is required
  • how often the maintenance is needed
  • if proof of maintenance is required

There are some finishes that increase the amount of maintenance. An example would be having the exterior of a portable home in solid timber which is oiled. Obviously, oiling the timber to keep it waterproof and for wood preservation would be essential; requiring more frequent maintenance than other exterior finishes.

 

 

How Far Can Relocatable Homes Be Transported? [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 18, 2010 under Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Distances Travelled by Relocatable Homes

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey talks about transport distances of relocatable homes.

 

 

You can freight modular homes very long distances; from Melbourne to Darwin if need be. Obviously, the further the distance, the greater the transport costs. Also, the number of portable homes modules have to be taken into consideration.

Basically, the deciding factor is budget.

If you are thinking about transporting your portable home some distance from the pre-manufactured homes factory; then remember you may find it harder to hire good local Tradesmen in remote locations and/or the Tradesmen you do hire have little or no experience assembling that particular design of relocatable home.

As for very remote or difficult locations; transportable homes can travel by road on a truck (which is normal), on a train, barge or via helicopter in extreme cases.

 

 

Transportable Homes Travelling Unsealed Roads [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 17, 2010 under Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Are Transportable Homes Strong Enough to Travel Over Unsealed Roads?

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey talks about transporting relocatable homes.

 

 

Yes. Apart from being designed to the safety and strength standards outlined in the Building Code of Australia, relocatable homes have extra reinforcing to cope with several moves over their lifetime.

A reputable contractor who builds portable homes will build each module on a heavy-duty galvanised steel chassis, which has been designed by structural building engineers to withstand –

  • unsealed roads
  • undulating surfaces; like on a new block of land
  • high wind gusts and flexing during transportation
  • stress when lifting and lowering the module by crane, hydraulics or jacks.

 

 

How are Joins Disguised on Modular Homes? [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 16, 2010 under Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Disguising Joins in Modular Homes

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey explains techniques used to hide joins.

 

 

There are many different ways to disguise the joins when placing the modules of  relocatable homes together.

One way is to design modular homes with interlocking pieces. When assembled on-site, the interlocking modules mesh together and look natural.

An example of disguising the join on the inside of a portable home may be the use of plastering on interior walls and ceilings. Plastering is used in the greater majority of traditionally built homes and is a very good way to cover joins so they are undetected.

Carpet, tiles and floating timber floors disguise the joins in the floor.

The exterior of portable homes have the natural and obvious joins like any other traditionally built home; like corners or when a full length of timber joins another matching length. Rendering covers joins very successfully and the matching of other building materials. The roofing is also matched and interlaced for make the roof line seamless.

In most cases, depending on the interior and exterior materials of your house; Builders should use the same materials using technologies to completely cover the fact the building is modular. Nobody should be able to see obvious joins. A well finished modular home should appear seamless with undetectable joins.

 

 

Viewing Transportable Homes During Construction [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 15, 2010 under Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Can I See My New Modular Home Being Built?

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey talks about inspections of relocatable homes during construction.

 

 

Yes! Any good reputable building contractor will welcome you on-site to inspect the progress of your new portable home.Before you sign any contracts, make sure you are allowed to view your relocatable home during its various stages of construction.

It is advisable to make your appointments in advance, that are mutually beneficial to both you and your pre-manufactured homes building contractor.

During visits you will be able to see if the project is running on schedule.  You can inspect the workmanship, monitor overall progress and get a feel for your new home.

 

 

How are Transportable Homes Built? [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 14, 2010 under Manufactured Homes, Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

What is the Building Process?

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey explains the building process of relocatable homes.

 

Transportable Homes are built to Australian Standards. There are several ways of building them but most commonly is

  • in a Building Contractor’s yard, or
  • in a very large shed

In both these instances it is reasonable to assume they will follow the most popular method of construct; which is in an assembly-line environment under very controlled conditions. A lot along the lines of a car factory where vehicles are assembled on a production-line.

There are many benefits  for this type of pre-manufactured homes construction –

  • Bulk purchasing using volume discounts
  • Better utilisation of  Tradesmen
  • Increased efficiency
  • Higher Quality Control systems
  • Less building materials waste

All of these add up to greater savings and less time consumed to create modular homes. The result being shorter waiting times for your portable homes and much better value for your money.

 

What Are Relocatable Homes

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 13, 2010 under Granny Flats, Manufactured Homes, Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Prefab, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Relocatable Homes Have Many Names

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey talks about various names used for portable homes.

 

Relocatable homes are also referred to as –

  • transportable homes
  • portable homes
  • pre-manufactured homes
  • manufactured homes
  • pre-built homes
  • modular homes
  • granny flats
  • prefabricated homes
  • prefabs
  • prefab homes
  • cabins
  • holiday park cabins
  • tourist cabins
  • affordable housing

 

These are all types of relocatable homes. However, they are not to be confused with a normally built house on a section of land that is ‘removed’ after a few years and transported to another location. These are just homes that have been removed.

Whereas, relocatable homes (or any other terminology used in the list above) are purposely designed to be transported and have extra reinforcing to cope with possibly several moves over their lifetime.

 

 

What is a Transportable Home? [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on under Granny Flats, Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Transportable Homes Have Many Names

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey explains the many different terms used for transportable homes.

 

Transportable homes are also referred to as –

  • relocatable homes
  • portable homes
  • pre-manufactured homes
  • manufactured homes
  • pre-built homes
  • modular homes
  • granny flats
  • prefabricated homes
  • prefabs
  • prefab homes
  • cabins
  • holiday park cabins
  • tourist cabins
  • affordable housing

 

These are all types of transportable homes. However, they are not to be confused with a traditionally built house on a block of land that is ‘moved’ after a period of years and transported to another location. These are purely houses that have been moved.

Whereas, transportable homes (or any other terminology used in the list above) are designed to be transported and have extra reinforcing to cope with possibly several moves over their lifetime.

 

 

Are There Extra Costs When Modifying Standard Floor-plans [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on under Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Modifying Standardised Floor-plans and the Extra Costs?

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey identifies alterations to standardised floor-plans  that may, or will definitely incur additional costs.

 

 

Small modifications to portable homes floor-plans can be made but may still require drafting fees. Some changes to a Standardised Floor-plan may be –

  • changing to a plastered ceiling instead of exposed beams
  • requesting a shub (shower and bath-tub combined) instead of a standard shower
  • upgrading the kitchen and changing the layout
  • changing the position of lights, light switches and power points
  • having a larger than normal fridge/freezer space

Drafting fees depend on the complexity of the modification to the plan. Structural changes are normally most expensive. Examples of more complex and/or larger changes could be –

  • adding, deleting or moving a door
  • adding, deleting or moving windows
  • extending the length of a bedroom
  • turning two small bedrooms into one large bedroom
  • changing the roof pitch or design for aesthetic purposes

Note: Every building contractor is different. It is a good idea to ask what the fees are for changing one of their standard floor-plans before you start modifying. Good building contractors will have a fair idea of the extra costs you will incur as they may have made similar alterations to the floor-plan before.

Also, when I state you may incur a drafting fee for making alterations, that means a drafting fee is likely. However, it does not include the actual materials and labour for making such a change.

Example:

You choose a standardised floor-plan, but you want a shub in the bathroom, instead of the basic shower because you have small children.

In this case you may or may not incur a drafting fee. It depends if the shub fits in the same space as the basic shower cubic. Some building contractors charge for this, and others don’t; regardless of the shub fitting exactly in the space or not.

Then, you have the additional cost of the shub, compared to the basic shower cubic that was included in the original design. You need to pay the difference.

And, you may have extra costs associated with the labour to fit the shub. The basic shower cubical may have been a one man labour unit to fit it in, but the shub is heavier and needs two men to fit it.

In conclusion, you may have three costs associated with changing from a basic shower to a shub in a standardised floor-plan in this example.

  1. Drafting Fee
  2. Upgrade Cost (price difference between the basic shower cubical and the shub)
  3. Labour/Tradesmen

 

 

Extra Costs When Modifying Standard Floor-plans [VIDEO]

Posted by Transportable Homes on July 12, 2010 under Modular Homes, Portable Homes, Relocatable Homes, Transportable Homes | Be the First to Comment

Does it cost extra to modify a standard floor-plan?

 

Transportable Homes Video – Tracey talks about costs associated with standardised floor-plan modification.

 

Minor changes to a transportable homes floor-plan can be accommodated but may still require a drafting fee. Small changes to Standardised Floor-plans may be –

  • changing to a plastered ceiling instead of exposed beams
  • requesting a shub (shower and bath-tub combined) instead of a standard shower
  • upgrading the kitchen and changing the layout
  • changing the position of lights, light switches and power points
  • having a larger than normal fridge/freezer space

Drafting fee amounts depend on the complexity of the alteration to the plan. Structural  changes are normally most expensive. More complex and/or larger changes could be –

  • adding, deleting or moving a door
  • adding, deleting or moving windows
  • extending the length of a bedroom
  • turning two small bedrooms into one large bedroom
  • changing the roof pitch or design for aesthetic purposes

Note: Every building contractor is different. It is a good idea to ask what the fees are for changing one of their standard floor-plans before you start modifying. Good building contractors will have a fair idea of the extra costs you will incur as they may have made similar alterations to the floor-plan before.